Once again, Mariners commercials are spot-on

Felix as King Tut, Seager tweets via typewriter, Cano makes beautiful music

Once again, Mariners commercials are spot-on

PEORIA, Ariz. -- Everybody knows about King Felix, but now there's King Tut Felix, King Arthur Felix and "The King" Felix for batters to deal with in 2014.

And, while any Mariners fan knows Kyle Seager brings old-school wares to the field every day, who knew he needed a fresh typewriter ribbon to tweet?

Those and a few other odd and entertaining riffs on Mariners players are now available for all to see as the latest batch of popular Mariners commercials have been released for the 2014 season.

The commercials, a collaboration between the team and Seattle agency Copacino + Fujikado as in years past, can be viewed on Mariners.com, where fans can vote for their favorites.

They include not only Felix Hernandez in a variety of royal roles and Seager as the down-and-dirty ballplayer, but also the poetry in motion of Robinson Cano set to music and Hisashi Iwakuma's ability to do just about anything, including spin on his head.

Shot on location at the Mariners' Spring Training complex and directed by Blue Goose Productions of Mercer Island, the commercial spots feature the tagline "True to the Blue," which the club says represents the connection fans have to the past, present and future of the Mariners.

This year's player-based commercials include:

Crowned: With each pitch he throws, Hernandez transforms himself into a line of kings, from King Tut to Elvis Presley.

Slow Mo & Music: Cano glides through the air in slow motion with a soundtrack for everything he does, leaving his new teammates in awe.

Old School: Seager, the team's old soul of a third baseman, shows up to the park with a dirty uniform and is so old school he uses a typewriter to tweet #hotcorner.

Quiet Surprise: Iwakuma shows many hidden talents, including making balloon animals and breakdancing.

The videos on Mariners.com also include a bloopers reel and another commercial that is part of a series of spots celebrating the history of the sport, including a tribute to Henry Chadwick, early baseball innovator and inventor of the box score.