Montero among players MLB may penalize

Connection to Biogenesis clinic could result in suspension

Montero among players MLB may penalize

SEATTLE -- Mariners catcher Jesus Montero's name is among about 20 players mentioned as facing possible suspensions by Major League Baseball in connection with an investigation of the Biognesis anti-aging clinic in Miami, according to a report Tuesday on ESPN's "Outside the Lines."

Montero's name came up in the spring in connection with reports of the clinic allegedly providing illegal performance-enhancing substances to numerous players. According to the ESPN report, Biogensis founder Anthony Bosch has reached an agreement to cooperate with MLB's investigators, which could lead to suspensions.

"The Mariners are aware of the report on ESPN," Mariners spokesman Tim Hevly said on Tuesday evening. "As you know, we strongly support Major League Baseball's joint drug treatment and prevention program. With no other information, there is no further comment we can make at this time. Any other questions should be answered by Major League Baseball."

Montero, 23, is currently on the disabled list with Triple-A Tacoma after being diagnosed on Saturday with a torn meniscus in his knee. Montero is scheduled to undergo surgery on the knee Wednesday in Seattle and is expected to be out four-to-six weeks.

Montero, one of the top prospects in baseball when he was acquired by the Mariners in a trade with the Yankees last year, was sent down to Tacoma after hitting .208 with three home runs and nine RBIs in 29 games for Seattle. He batted .260 with 15 homers and 62 RBIs in 135 games last year.

Montero hit .250 with three doubles and a triple in seven games with Tacoma while playing mostly first base after his demotion, but he has been sidelined since his knee flared up while he was catching last week, and tests revealed the meniscus tear.

Greg Johns is an associate reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregJohnsMLB as well as his Mariners Musings blog. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.