Wedge rests Ackley on bobblehead night

Wedge rests Ackley on bobblehead night

SEATTLE -- About 20,000 Mariners fans received Dustin Ackley bobbleheads on Friday, but they didn't get a chance to see Ackley play in person as manager Eric Wedge gave the young second baseman the night off.

Wedge was just resting Ackley as part of his plan to keep players fresh during a stretch of 20 games in 20 days and didn't realize it was Ackley's promotional day until told by the media in his pregame session before facing the Angels.

"Oh geez, is it? I didn't get that memo," Wedge said. "Well, it shows you how much I pay attention to that, I guess. He can revel in his own bobblehead without having to worry about playing then, how about that? I'm surprised I haven't gotten a phone call on that one yet."

Ackley, who matches Wedge in his single-minded focus, wasn't concerned about the oversight.

"I don't think he really worries about anything beyond what's going on in the field," Ackley said. "And that's good."

Angels outfielder Peter Bourjos had the same thing happen earlier this year when he didn't play on his first bobblehead day either.

"Maybe that's a theme now," Ackley said with a laugh. "You get a bobblehead and you get a night off."

Ackley was taking some good-natured ribbing from teammates both for having the bobblehead and for not playing on "his" day, but acknowledged it was a nice compliment to have his likeness being handed out and said the designers did a good job.

"It's pretty cool," he said. "There are some resemblances, yeah. The beard is pretty good. I wish it was a little thicker, but overall they did a pretty good job. The bat, the elbow guard, they got all the little things you wouldn't always expect to see."

Now if he was just able to get a chance to play on his day.

"If it was up to me, I wouldn't have a single day off," Ackley said. "But you have to go with the flow. They always told me, 'If you don't like it, play better.' I heard that a lot in the Minor Leagues."